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Fairnooks

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Reply with quote  #51 
I like it, I think the base is there, maybe just needs a little more accent on the seat tube as the cables don't seem quite enough. With some of the Quasimoto's I put together though, far be it for me to judge! Oftentimes mine get the WOH treatment (whatever's on hand).

The ride you describe is probably in the flex of the wheels, tires, fork and frame; the downside is too much flex for heavier folk and hard riders, something that has been so successfully eradicated in modern performance bikes, companies now put compliance back into the frame with flexible seat stays or inserts, smaller diameter carbon fiber seat posts, and even stranger things like Isospeed decouplers!  
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jbuckley

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Reply with quote  #52 
Soup,

Thanks for the feedback.  The picture doesn't really do it justice, the yellows match much better than the picture shows.  Though, I see what you mean with looking like they were just thrown on there.  Those are colors of the burger shop that was my "underwriter".  I'd love to learn how to do a fade like you're describing.    What if it had yellow wall tires? Would that help tie it in?

I just dropped it off and my patron loved it.  It's going on a wall, but I bade him to ride it first!  We just got home and my wife proclaimed, "ONE LESS BIKE...in our living room!"

Nooks,

I'm beginning to have a collection of half full cans of paint and primer, red, orange, blue, yellow, purple, black.  With the next bike I'll have to see if I can create a true Frankenbike.  Though, I just picked up an interesting frame for free that has a date stamped on it, "1946"  I'm sure it was someone just screwing with metal stamps though.

Also, I'm waiting on a yellow saddle, the white was taken from my previous build.  I'll see how it looks before deciding.  I personally, like the white saddle and white walls.  Overall, for my second ever bike build, I'll take both of these as compliments.  And truly, I wouldn't and couldn't have done it without help from you guys.
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Fairnooks

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Reply with quote  #53 
Aw, bent and busticated frames are available from ebay if all's they want is wall art.

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soup

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Reply with quote  #54 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbuckley
I'd love to learn how to do a fade like you're describing.    What if it had yellow wall tires? Would that help tie it in?



So would I. [smile] 
  The white sidewalls and saddle look fine to me maybe yellow sidewalls would make the rubber look "old", (don't really know have never seen them).
   I in no way meant by comments as a critisism.  Just a quick off-the-cuff summary of what I could see.  Far be it for me to criticize others work considering some of the complete and utter messes I have produced.

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Fairnooks

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Reply with quote  #55 
Since it's too hot and humid to ride and raining twice a day lately AND because Mongoose gets a ton of ridicule these days in the live show comments...a 1999 or 2000 DX 10.9 titanium frame, 22 lb. Mongoose off road race bike. Like many, their glory days are gone but there are some remnants and reminders. 


Mongoose sr.JPG 



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nathan8856

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Reply with quote  #56 
my daily commuter is a 2015 diamondback century 2, unfortunately the original front wheel is missing [frown]. i bought it a couple months ago and have just passed 400 miles. [IMG_10711_zpsr7p1l6x3]  [image] 
then theres my old bike, a faithful mid 90's diamondback db expert tg with 3400 miles on it.  [IMG_0654_zpsuw6q7rtn] 
and my current project a 70's schwinn (im turning it into a fixie, this is how it sits now and im waiting on a few parts)  [EB85C27D-EB51-457D-9526-A8834A0F6BDF_zps3x8ej6fy] 
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Fairnooks

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Reply with quote  #57 
I opted for the Haanjo Comp because I wanted a little more wheel clearance options; white hoods seems to be DB's fashion statement of late. I like that but the DB logo scheme is a bit hit and miss (mostly the later). My impression of DB is nothing fancy, solid performers, and good spec and value for the money if picked up on sale. 

DB Haanjo Comp.JPG 

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Fairnooks

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Reply with quote  #58 
I think this is the first Cannondale, 21 years old now I think, unique design for the time. I've worn through a couple drivetrains on this one. It was manufactured for a one and one quarter inch steerer; stem and fork options were always limited until Giant (and now Canyon) finally started producing their oversized headset. Also note the cantilever effect where the seat stays attach to the chainstays significantly forward from the axle. This makes the bike one of the best climbers I've ever been on because the rider's weight really pushes straight down through the wheel and into the tire when the bike tilts up.

KV n Garfeild.JPG 

KV-frame.JPG 



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alanC

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Reply with quote  #59 
I always wanted a Cannondale way back but had no money for one. Its interesting to see how fashions change in cycling. The minimal stickers on the Cannondale compared to the DB which has stickers and logo everywhere, cranks and seat post too! Too many logos on the wheels for me nowadays. I got some Kinlin Polaris 29er rims last year the sticker logos where bigger than on the frame set. Thank god they pealed off easy. The DB looks like a great all round bike part from the stickers.

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Pamela

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Reply with quote  #60 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbuckley
Just finished my 2nd rebuild. circa 1983 Univega Custom Maxima, the Burger Spot Bike.  The only problem is that it rides so smoothly I don't want to give it up.  I never rode many 27", mostly 26 on my old mountain bike and 700 on my road bike, but they sure are comfortable.

Univega Before and After.jpg 
Absolutely gorgeous re-build! I'd be so happy and proud if I were the burger shop owner. You've brought a well-built early '80s road bike right into the 21st century. I love the new streamlined look. Fashionistas would applaud how you applied the technique of colorblocking with the yellow fork and bar wrap. Well done!

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nathan8856

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Reply with quote  #61 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fairnooks
I opted for the Haanjo Comp because I wanted a little more wheel clearance options; white hoods seems to be DB's fashion statement of late. I like that but the DB logo scheme is a bit hit and miss (mostly the later). My impression of DB is nothing fancy, solid performers, and good spec and value for the money if picked up on sale. 

DB Haanjo Comp.JPG
 

very nice bike!, love the look of white brake hoods but mine are starting to turn brown. i personally LOVE diamondback road bikes and i am very partial to the brand. they are a great bang for the buck, and look very nice (no one ever mistakes them for a walmart bike lol). i personally love the paint scheme on both my century 2, and your haanjo. when i got my century 2 new there was not a thing that i felt the need to change or upgrade on it (besides the pedals of course) for most bikes i upgrade the tires, handlebar tape, and seat.. maybe im just not very picky, but i think they outfitted it perfectly. just my two cents on them, when i get a mountain bike guess which brand im gonna get? [smile]. that being said what rack is that? i think it'd work well on my bike.
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Fairnooks

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Reply with quote  #62 
It is a Topeak Explorer MTX; I didn't need the disc brake version because the rear disc brake is in the crook of the seat stay/chain stay angle. I don't have any MTX accessory but I think I'm going to get the matching basket and try that because my other spring-loaded tubular clamp basket can get knocked off a bit now and then on rough road.

The only thing I had to change was the seatpost because with the setback one I was too far behind the pedals. Zero setback is spot on with what must be a more relaxed seat tube angle than the Century.
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nathan8856

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Reply with quote  #63 
so i finished that schwinn last night, total cost including the bike was $113. i decided to go with a single speed/coaster brake setup instead of fixed gear. i went with a 19t sprocket because i live in a VERY hilly area and anything lower i'd be walking it up the hills.  [IMG_1399_zpszhxra8c5]  [IMG_1396_zpsub6i9upt] 
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Fairnooks

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Reply with quote  #64 

Though I'd like to have a nice light flickable single speed, I think I could only ride it on a few select roads in my area, the more busy main valley roads, which aren't that fun to begin with. From a larger article about bicycle gearing for rides in and around the Driftless Area hills...there's a century ride in my area in August that will be just under 9000 ft. of climbing, or elevation gain. Not all at once of course but two and a half dozen climbs will kick the snot out even more unless one is careful to meter out the effort.

As you may have noticed during some of the Sunday Bombay rides, southern Wisconsin is far from flat. Remember Vermont Church Road? Climbing hills is always work, but if it seems really miserable, chances are your lowest gear just isn't low enough. According to the US Geological Survey, the average grades for at least 100 vertical feet for some of our favorite hills are:

Denzer Road, northbound8.7 percent
Observatory Road, northbound9.5 percent
Enchanted Valley Road, northbound11.1 percent (Ugh!)
Mounds Park Road, southbound10.0 percent

Even the first hill up Old Sauk Road westbound averages 10 percent for 50 vertical feet. So, for southern Wisconsin 10 percent is a reasonable value for maximum grade, unless you do Enchanted Valley often. Elsewhere in the Driftless Area, there are probably grades of close to 15 percent. The climb up to Wyalusing State Park comes to mind.

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Fairnooks

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Reply with quote  #65 
Updated and renamed: Beer cooler transporter; already successfully tested!

BeerBike.jpg 


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alanC

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Reply with quote  #66 
That looks great. What is that Bar basket combo thing? Never seen that before.
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Fairnooks

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Reply with quote  #67 
It's the Origin 8 front basket and handlebar combo platter (http://www.bikemanforu.com/EXPANDED-CATALOG/BASKET_ORIGIN8_FRONT_ALLOY_CC2_wHB_25.4_BLACK.html).

I'm tall enough to maintain a semi-aggressive position on the bike even with the mo higher bars and in a pinch I can steer with hands on the top of the basket if I need a burst of aero speed. The one piece combo keeps the steering crisp even with weight in the basket so I give it two thumbs up. 

BeerBike2.JPG 

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alanC

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Reply with quote  #68 
Brilliant and only $65. I want a pair.

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nathan8856

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Reply with quote  #69 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fairnooks

Though I'd like to have a nice light flickable single speed, I think I could only ride it on a few select roads in my area, the more busy main valley roads, which aren't that fun to begin with. From a larger article about bicycle gearing for rides in and around the Driftless Area hills...there's a century ride in my area in August that will be just under 9000 ft. of climbing, or elevation gain. Not all at once of course but two and a half dozen climbs will kick the snot out even more unless one is careful to meter out the effort.

As you may have noticed during some of the Sunday Bombay rides, southern Wisconsin is far from flat. Remember Vermont Church Road? Climbing hills is always work, but if it seems really miserable, chances are your lowest gear just isn't low enough. According to the US Geological Survey, the average grades for at least 100 vertical feet for some of our favorite hills are:

Denzer Road, northbound8.7 percent
Observatory Road, northbound9.5 percent
Enchanted Valley Road, northbound11.1 percent (Ugh!)
Mounds Park Road, southbound10.0 percent

Even the first hill up Old Sauk Road westbound averages 10 percent for 50 vertical feet. So, for southern Wisconsin 10 percent is a reasonable value for maximum grade, unless you do Enchanted Valley often. Elsewhere in the Driftless Area, there are probably grades of close to 15 percent. The climb up to Wyalusing State Park comes to mind.

 
i too have a lot of hills, i tried to use this bike to commute the other day and underestimated how long it takes to take off with a coaster brake single speed and came within a couple feet of getting run over by an SUV going 50mph while trying to cross an inner section. after that and how much of a pain it is on hills, i can say i will NOT be using it to commute or go on any main roads. the only thing i see myself doing on it is short neighbor hood rides with the family. still it was a fun project bike.
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soup

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Reply with quote  #70 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nathan8856

how much of a pain it is on hills,


  I have a similar problem .  I tried to take the "commuter bike" (it is supposed to be a hybrid but it is a rigid with normal gearing [i.e. not short enough for a mountaian bike]) over the Pentland hills it was OK on the grassy bits and the sort of gravel paths but the stoney paths rattled the fillings out of my teeth at anything more than (say) 7mph.  I would have been a lot better of with some suspension (heck even a suspension seat post would have helped a bit).  Uphills were a chore and I couldn't really get the time  back on the downhills as I couldn't go above 7(ish)MPH. 
    Teach me to try and use a commuter on what should be "mountain bike" territory.
    Yes a commuter was usable but I would have went a lot faster and easier with a proper off-road bike.
    The trailfinder is fine for (even badly maintained) road, walkway path and canal tow-path use but it is no cope with proper off-road.




Edited to add:-
  Water bottle belonged to chap I had let past me (I caught up with him further along the valley [thankfully road now] and gave him it back) .  Squeeling must have been caused by water or mud on the rims as it didn't do that again.

       HORSES (or rather bikes) FOR COURSES


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Fairnooks

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Reply with quote  #71 
Sign me up for that trail, I'd try it on anything as wide or wider than a 40 mm tyre, but it looked like full suspension would be the funnest. Were you running same pressure in the tyres as normal road? If so and you had a pump with, lowering them to 2.5-3 bar depending on rider and bike weight might help quite a bit on rough trail, provided they were 40+ mm to begin with.
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soup

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Reply with quote  #72 
They were a "hybrid tire"
( http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/products/specialized-new-crossroads-armadillo-tyre?bct=browse%2faccessories%2ftyres-tubes-puncture-repair-prevention%2ftyres-hybrid-commuting )
got tired (see what I did there) of the road 'thrum' of a full hybrid, they have also required (so far; touches wood)  zero maintenance as regards punctures and they were at "normal" pressure as that route has a LOT of road, and I didn't realise the trail was going to be such a trial so hadn't adjusted pressures. In hindsight I should've let the tyres down a bit and pumped them back up .  They are 1.9 inches which is 48 mm.

As I commented on that vid in YT it is a fantastic trail but like all things the proper equipment increases the pleasure .  Yes a fully rigid commuter will handle it but a hard tail will increase the fun, never saw a full suss (also never ridden a decent one so no idea what they ride like) on it but would imagine it's even better, especially the steep downhilly bits.


Edited to correct layout (a bit).

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Marc Ariss

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Reply with quote  #73 
New wheels, rotors, and rubber !

P1010087.JPG 


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Fairnooks

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Reply with quote  #74 
Semi-slicks? Are they light? If so and not so, the only problem I have with those and Soup's tyre is mo weight. I think it said over 900 grams in the literature for the Armadillos. Uff-da! That's over 4 lbs. of tyres! I risk the occasional thorn puncture for low rotational weight, for road and up to moderate trail use I put 435 gram Kenda Kwicks on and I won't go over 650 grams no matter what. I don't mind spinning up my sizeable carcass but can't stand a heavy tyre! On flatter terrain I suppose heavy is more manageable but they distress what's left of my brain on variable terrain.

Oops, I have to modify my weight limit, spiked and chained tyres are given exemption since they keep my sizable carcass upright most of the time in Winter.
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gktessier@comcast.net

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Reply with quote  #75 
Wow soup !

      That is one amazing trail, and some beautiful county side ! With the proper bike that would be a great trail to rip on. Enjoyed the video keep-em coming.


   
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gktessier@comcast.net

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Reply with quote  #76 
 Marc how's the cube doing ? How's the ride ? It sure looks sweat.
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soup

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Reply with quote  #77 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fairnooks
On flatter terrain I suppose heavy is more manageable but they distress what's left of my brain on variable terrain.



Virtually all of my riding is on flattish (ha! every where is uphill fron everywhere else here) terrain (the odd off-road trail notwithstanding) I consider canal tow path to be badly maintained (and in this weather; muddy) road.  So I don't really notice how heavy the tires are .
   No hard figures (I.E. guessing) but I reckon one in ten rides would get a puncture without those Armadillos (quite often hear stones/gravel being 'pinged' by my wheels).  I couldn't put up with that amount of punctures , bit more than "the occasional thorn puncture"


Looking good Marc

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Fairnooks

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Reply with quote  #78 
Code:
i personally LOVE diamondback road bikes and i am very partial to the brand. they are a great bang for the buck, and look very nice (no one ever mistakes them for a walmart bike lol). i personally love the paint scheme on both my century 2, and your haanjo


I may have just jumped aboard that train with both feet...I ran across the Interval Carbon (Red) and the frame is downright gorgeous to my eyes both visually and structurally (I'm lukewarm on some of the components) for what I consider a modest budget bike.

diamondback_interval_carbon_002.jpg 

P1010065.JPG   

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soup

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Reply with quote  #79 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gktessier@comcast.net
Enjoyed the video keep-em coming.
   



Here is another video of crossing the Pentlands .  It was all I could find on my hard drive.  This crossing is MUCH shorter than the previous one .  And is really only the crossing into the Pentlands as the other side of that gate is a road along a valley IN the Pentlands.  Please ignore the sound as the camera is rigidly fixed to the frame so every little creek/rattle/whirr that the bike makes is transmited and amplified by the cameras housing, the bike is not really that noisy.  The path here is much smoother than the one in the "Wrong bike" video though those water channels are f(*&ing murder. And the boards across the path going up to help stop erosion are murder too (haven't got the strength just to 'bunny hop' them so have to cycle around them).

Style (15:27) is at "the Maiden's cleugh" (young lady's ravine: a pass(ish) through the hill) it is all up hill to there then all downhill



Fourth attempt after all that it's not really that worth it ,hay ho.

 

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Fairnooks

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Reply with quote  #80 
Sometimes processing phase hangs too; at least it has on two occasions for me; I had to re-up the whole thing and use the copy as I could not figure how to get the original to finish processing.
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nathan8856

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Reply with quote  #81 
fairnooks, that thing is beautiful! thinking about getting the 2015 diamondback recoil (just gotta find a way to justify spending the money [smile]). anyways about diamondback paint, i get so many compliments on mine, ranging from the decals to the metal flake.
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nathan8856

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Reply with quote  #82 
i do have one complaint about the paint scheme though, the white on the fork shows alot of brake dust when riding in wet conditions![2FAA45C1-2BC4-432C-80E3-2B4819264175_zps7aas7ih1] 
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soup

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Reply with quote  #83 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fairnooks
modest budget bike.  


  Hardly what I would consider Budget, OK it's not 'top of the line' but for around £1000 I would expect no compromises(and certainly no "I would have thought they could go to a ...X... for that") .

£200 Budget (cheap)
£500 entry level
£1000~£2000 enthusiast.
 Yes there are the "£10,000" super ships, but realistically that is the sort of price levels I would expect.

Perhaps controverstial view :-
  No one needs a bike of more than say £1000/$1500~£2000/$3000 (unless they are profesionals looking to shave two seconds of a  hundred miles) and for most non-club riders £500/$700~£1000/$1400 is sufficient.
Aside :- Mind you I am the type of person who gets annoyed(slight overstatement there) when the likes of "TopGear" justify top speeds of cars of 250MPH.  The speed limit (in the UK anyway) is 70, can see cars need a wee bit in excess of that to be safe and for some motorway driving but really an extra (say) £150,000 to be able to go 180 over the speed limit as opposed to being able to go 30 over the limit... The term diminishing returns might have been invented for me/this situation.

Just thought, you might have meant Budget in the sense of "amount to spend" not cheap in which case ignore first line.

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Fairnooks

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Reply with quote  #84 
I try to consider each bike in it's "class" and the sale prices I'm seeing, not so much the manufacturer's price. So I'm only comparing the Interval to the likes of the Anywhere CoMax and the GT Grade carbon and Trek's and Special Ed's and Salsa's version and so forth, so I should probably amend to budget bike in it's class. I don't know if it's just because the roads are going to pot so much and I don't want to be limited with my road bike, but I'm really digging the gravel grinder types right now, which are basically cross bikes with a compact front chainset instead of the more narrow cross spread.

How about enthusiast's budget bike? The lightweight full-suspension cross country rig might be difficult to keep in your price range though I did just manage it with my Sunn Shamann Finest; and the difference between a 25-27 lb. rig (or in my case, the 22.5lb. rig) and a 32 lb. rig really is night and day. What I am constantly amazed by is how much the downhill bombers will spend on a beeforama bike, just to go downhill and basically beat the living bejesus out of it with wear and tear and spectacular crashes.
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soup

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Reply with quote  #85 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fairnooks
the difference between a 25-27 lb. rig (or in my case, the 22.5lb. rig) and a 32 lb. rig really is night and day.


Yeah, but think of the roads that slope down.
Wheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!    [biggrin]

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Fairnooks

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Reply with quote  #86 
Yes, but the "awful" truth is ya want something to at least tolerate climbing with, if not outright enjoy it because more time is going to be spent climbing. If I climb a 1 mile hill at 6 miles an hour, 10 minutes; turn around and descend at 24 miles an hour, a mere 2.5 minutes of reward!
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soup

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Reply with quote  #87 
The 5~10 lb difference is more than made up with all the junk I carry in my pannier[1] and whether I have just had a 'comfort stop' and what I have eaten and the weight I could comfortably lose and... Seriously weight (within reason) doesn't bother me so much .

[1] Currently includes two tubes , apuncture repair outfit(FSVO) and a pump even though I have tyres that could probably cope with a small bomb,
maybe I should stop being so paranoid.

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Marc Ariss

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Reply with quote  #88 
The Cube is holding up really well gktessier , and I have been really trying to punish it. Id buy a Cube again in a heartbeat. I did notice the difference in pictures is very minimal....Im not attention whoring, lol I really did put new rubber and rotors on.
Thanks Soup Im loving the ride along vids you have done recently.

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soup

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Reply with quote  #89 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marc Ariss
T
Thanks Soup Im loving the ride along vids you have done recently.


Here is another one basically it is the same sort of area as the other two. 

Those hills are the Pentlands.
If your internet can handle it 1080 is the way to go I wouldn't even bother with sound as the camera is fixed to the frame so basically all you can hear is every creak/rattle/whine/rumble the frame makes ,highly amplified.  Perhaps one of these days I will do a GK and put music to them but as they are by way of experiment[1] don't really want to put that much effort in.

[1] My original plan was get a GoPro and use that but before this I decided to experiment with a cheap chinese knock-off, asto where the best place to mount it was and at what quality but I have found that any video showing a decent amount tends to be very long so I can't see me bothering getting another camera any route I want to show I will probably use a stop frame(flicker book) and for that (stills) I will not require the developedness of a GoPro.

Additional :-
Here is one of the stop frme/flicker book style.


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Fairnooks

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Reply with quote  #90 
I say, all the dogs you meet seem frightfully nice and well-behaved. Where I ride out in the countryside, they are a lot more aggressive and "in yo face!" I did get a good laugh a couple days ago though when a dog came at an angle out of the ditch, barking it's head off and headed straight for my front wheel...he put all 30 centimeters and three quarter stone into the effort!
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Reply with quote  #91 
I think its the sheer shock on behalf of the owners that a cyclist not only "tings" his bell and shouts "hello/cheers folks/thank you/right guys" whatever seems most appropriate and gives them a wide berth rather than some of the entitled (feeling) MAMILs (middle age male in Lycra) that we get bombing around here.
 I still HATE those extending leads things you get the owner one side of the path, dog on the other, and a virtually invisible line between them .

Mind you a lot of the videos are shot in "sheep country" so the owners (mostly)only take well behaved dogs for walks there AND KEEP THEM ON LEASHES it's amazing how much better behaved dogs are when  they are tied to their owners.
I also make sure the dogs have seen me by making silly noises (same with sheep/horses etc) there is nothing worse than a dog who is "snuffling" in the undergrowth that suddenly finds a bicycle beside them and of course they will react to this (what appears to be)  silent attack.
  The wee yappers ("30 centimetres, half a stone and  barking their heads off") are amusing when they attack you lots of "och behave yourself" loud enough for the owner to hear, all the time thinking come here ya little &^%$(*& I'll give you something to bark at

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joego69

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Reply with quote  #92 
Whipped this up yesterday.
1974 Schwinn Continental.
I bought the BMFU 27X1 1/4 Coaster Brake/Front wheel set, a $7 chain, non bikeman(sorry)tubes, tires and rim strips,
Swapped in the schwinn clover crank/sprocket set I had from a 72 womens super sport.
Removed all gearing and brake sytstems.
Sweated it out all day in the summer sun.
Enjoyed every minute.
Pictures are kind of a general before/after timeline.

Are the pics upside down when viewed? If so sorry.

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Fairnooks

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Reply with quote  #93 
Do you remember what your interval time was for the stop motion capture soup? I have an option like that on my camera and it would be helpful knowledge to get closer to the interval and display time I want sooner rather than later. 

On another subject, anyone know what period of history these monster pods as I call them came from?

The pods.jpg


DSC_0004.JPG 

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soup

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Reply with quote  #94 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fairnooks
Do you remember what your interval time was for the stop motion capture soup?


Pretty sure it was three second intervals between images then shown back at .15 seconds between images.
   I remember I had tried two or three different ranges, five seconds was too long as a lot of "stuff" was lost, two gave too much detail and looked strangely as if it had less information as it looked like a "real video" gone wrong .  The time(speed of ) playback was arrived at by experiment . 

   Pick a couple of mile loop you know well and belt around it a few times with the camera taking images at different speeds then try each speed at different playback rates, yes it will take a day or two but you will find what you like best, not sure I have fully done that, should practise what I preach etc etc .  This 3, .15 is, to my eyes, no where near the "best" speed but it will do.

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Fairnooks

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Reply with quote  #95 
Who wants a M2 Metal Matrix vintage Stumpjumper? I like it but I hardly ever ride it for some reason. I can't remember if I bought just the frame and built it up or if it was a complete bike (a sure sign I have too many bikes) but I see by looking at it, it certainly is custom now; Chris King rear wheel, Mavic front, Richey tire front, Hutch rear, Sette seatpost, GT saddle and Raceface stem! Oh, and the fork obviously now that I look; I don't think they came with disc mounts back in 1996 [biggrin]. I think next year is it's 20th birthday and it's in great shape.

Image1.jpg 

P1010072.JPG 




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NDferro

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Reply with quote  #96 
1995 A2m Barracuda Work in Progress. .

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sidekarz

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Reply with quote  #97 

I am a retired soldier. (@ 6ft x 200lbs x 54yrs)   I live next to a canal and towpath. (http://delawareandlehigh.org/) I recover and resurrect unloved bicycles as a hobby. I rescued my bicycle about a dozen years ago. I ride it almost every day, but never more than 30-35 miles. I have named it “Lazarus”.

The large, 23-inch “Schwinn Quality” frame was a trash-picked 26” mountain bike. (The cable lugs had been roughly hacked-off the frame!?!?!) I painted it with a spray can. The side-pull brakes were damaged and replaced with salvaged center-pull brakes.  The front wheel was missing. I combined a 1960s (?) Schwinn “Made in France” front hub and a used rim to build a replacement. The rear wheel was bent and had several broken spokes. The rear hub is a 7-gear cassette. The front gears and pedals are original to the frame. The plastic chain ring has been replaced. The Shimano Altus rear derailleur and handlebar controls were salvaged from a newer Schwinn MTN bike. The “vintage” aluminum stem quill is stamped “CUSTOM” in the front. The 29 x 12 handlebars were salvaged from an old 20-inch “banana-seat” bike. All bearings, races, spacers and nuts have been removed, cleaned and re-greased. Small parts were replaced or up-graded using other salvaged parts whenever possible. An Instep/Schwinn trailer hitch is mounted on the rear axle. I “detailed” the skull valve cap. The sleigh bell hanging from my basket keeps “evil spirits” out of my way.

I bought the B135 at least 10 years ago. I recall reading somewhere in Brooks’ description that the saddle’s suspension was “originally designed for the rough roads of Africa”. I have been to Africa and the towpath is very similar to some of those roads. The saddle’s color was originally “Honey” and it does show some “patina”. The B135 has been absolutely perfect for the type of riding that I do and I want to emphasize the superior quality of the product.

A bell is a great courtesy. Over half of the people that I pass say “Thank you” for having alerted them as I approached. A quality bell can be heard at a much greater distance than an “On your left!” I bought an original “Incredibell” about 20 years ago and it is still mounted on one of the bikes. I have up-graded to a “Brass Duet”. There are at least nine Incredibells in my family’s “Fleet” of bicycles. I have given them to friends and neighbors as gifts. They are loud, very durably, and come in many styles and colors.

The new set of black Planet Bike Cascadia 26”ATB 60mm wide fenders simply replaced the silver pair that I had been using for years. There was nothing wrong with them and I put them on one of other bikes. There are three sets of silver Cascadia ATBs in the “Fleet”. They look good, work great, are very easy to assemble & adjust and can take a beating. I like the black fenders. 

I prefer a front basket for carrying my “stuff”. Ape-hanger handlebars and a short quill stem allow the basket to be mounted lower, which lowers the center of gravity. I recently bought a new Sunlite basket. I replaced a larger Wald basket that I had used for several years. (It cost $5 at a yard sale.) It was too big, although I once did use it to carry two 6-packs of beer and 3 bottles of wine 8 miles. I prefer the adjustable legs and the general appearance of the Sunlite basket.

I replaced an old Greenfield 285mm kickstand with a new Greenfield 305mm kickstand. Adding slightly bigger tires, bigger seats, bigger handlebars, fenders and baskets & racks to old “Mountain” bikes tends to make them top-heavy. The 305mm kickstand solves the problem and I have put them on three other bikes. (I saw it demonstrated on “BikemanforU”. Thanks, Bikeman!)

My Mirrycle Mirror’s lens cracked when my top-heavy bike fell over (prior to the 305mm Greenfield), but the replacement mirror was inexpensive. I have two more Mirrycles mounted on other bikes. (One was mounted on my bike for years prior to seeing Bikeman discussing one on Youtube.)

Schwalbe makes superior tires.  I first bought a set of Ritchey SuperMax BETA 2.0 tires and, within a year, I had a “blow-out”. I next bought set of Kenda Kwick 1.95 tires and, within a year, I had another “blow-out”. (One of the bikes now has a nice set of un-matched tires.) I next bought a pair of Schwalbe “The Original” Marathon reflective 2.0 tires, and I have been running them for years. I have put a set of Schwalbe Land Cruisers on another bike and a set of cream-colored Schwalbe Delta Cruisers on another. 

bike day 030.jpg
bike a day 010.jpg

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sidekarz

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Reply with quote  #98 
Schwinn Mesa Runner.JPG My Sweetheart’s “Towpath Cruiser”

The early-1980s Schwinn Mesa Runner 10-speed cost $20 at a local yard sale. I re-packed the bearings and replaced the cables & brake pads. I recently installed a new set of Schwalbe Land Cruisers (50-559). I have added a tall Sunlite stem quill, a Wald basket, a set of silver Planet Bike Cascadia ATB fenders, a silver  Incredibell “Brass Duet”, a Third Eye mirror and an “Instep/Schwinn” trailer hitch. I replaced a 285mm Greenfield kickstand with a new 305mm Greenfield. I added the handlebar extensions and replaced the seat post with salvaged parts. I purchased a very lightly-used Brooks B67S saddle at a very fair price. A sleigh bell hangs from the front basket. 


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sidekarz

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Reply with quote  #99 
Daughter's Bicycle.JPG

A Daughter’s "Towpath Cruiser"

I collected five used, low-budget bicycles within two weeks: a Roadmaster, a Huffy, a Murray, a Mongoose and a Schwinn. It appears as if someone put inexpensive replacement tires, tubes and rim strips on a 1990s Schwinn and then “tossed the bike out with the trash”. The tires were absolutely clean and still had that “new rubber smell”. The black wheels are from the Mongoose. I tediously peeled all the “Roadmaster” stickers from the dark blue frame. Selected parts from the Roadmaster, Huffy and Murray were salvaged, cleaned, re-greased and assembled into one functional 10-speed bicycle. I replaced the cables & brake pads. I added a pink  Incredibell “Brass Duet” bell, a pair of pink Dice valve caps, a Mountain Mirrycle mirror, a black Sunlite basket, a black Greenfield 305mm kickstand and an “Instep/Schwinn” trailer hitch. I cut about 2” off each end of the new Sunlite ape-hangers. The rear spoke protector is new. The stainless steel fenders were “created” using miscellaneous salvaged parts. (The front fender was “crumpled”.) The Schwinn Quality seat is a lightly-used “hand-me-down”. The Hunt-Wilde hand grips and the Shimano duel shift-levers are “vintage” salvaged parts. The front fork ends have no eyelets for mounting a basket, but I found a pair of vintage spacers with attached eyelets in the salvaged-parts bin.   

 

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Fairnooks

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Reply with quote  #100 
Very nice sidekarz, from a distance at least, they look straight off the showroom floor, probably do up close too.
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