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PennyF@rthing

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hello everyone,

I'm new on this forum and this is my first post. I live around the Boston area and since the cold weather is fast approaching I just bought an old Raleigh Grand Prix 10-speed that I would like to fix up and ride this coming Spring. I found the serial number and it looks like it was built by the Gazelle company in Holland in September of 1974. My plan is definitely to get new rims, tires, and front and back brakes. I'm also thinking maybe new front and back derailleurs, new shifters, new brake levers, new crank and new bottom bracket? Also, I know that some people convert these old bikes to either fixed gear or single speed bikes. It would be great if you guys could provide some feedback on the pros/cons on each of these conversions and how difficult it is to do it.
I know that's quite a bit of work, but the project is in the early stages, and I'm just trying to get a plan. 
Also, what's the best way to go about getting new parts for this bike that will fit? Feel free to offer any suggestions, restoring ideas, and tips that may help.
I have a little experience with bikes, but more importantly I have quite a bit of time until next Spring. So I would like to just go slow, do this right, and have some fun.

Thanks.
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Pamela

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Reply with quote  #2 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PennyF@rthing
Hello everyone, ...I just bought an old Raleigh Grand Prix 10-speed that I would like to fix up and ride this coming Spring...Thanks.


Hi, Pennyf@rthing, Welcome to the BikemanforU community, and congrats on the Raleigh find. Just wondering what kind of shape it's in - would love to see some pix of what the bike looks like. Do the components show a lot of wear? Sometimes a good cleaning and lube, plus some new rcubber can make an old bike ride like new. Sebastian's scrub-a-dub transformed the chrome on my 1970s Vista 10-speed. As Tenspeed says, there's several directions you can go with a rehab/restoration/rebuild or however you choose to proceed. Please keep us posted! All best, Pamela / Customer Support


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PennyF@rthing

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Reply with quote  #3 
Hello!

Thanks for the replies, I really appreciate it.  I'll try to get some photos up soon so you can get a better idea of what I'm talking about.  I know this isn't a very collectible or expensive bike, and I may end up putting more money into it then it's actually worth, but that's okay to me because really I just want to use this bike as a way to learn more about fixing/tinkering with old bikes.  So if it costs a little bit of money then I'm fine with that.  .

So to answer the big question of what I will end up using this bike for.  The way I see it right now, this bike won't become a daily commuter, but more of a fun weekend bike for getting around town and possibly some longer day trips.

In regards to Tenspeed's well laid out full resto vs bastardization debate, I think I am leaning slightly towards bastardization.  I think I want to to turn this bike into a singlespeed drivetrain with a few other modifications.  You made a good point that a singlespeed will be a simpler machine in the end, and I've never had a singlespeed so this will be new and interesting.  Also, I was planning on changing out the front and rear deraillers initially, but with a singlespeed I could just take them off along with the shifters and be done.  Of course, I'll save all the parts in case I ever want to put them back on.  If I go this route, do I replace both sets of brakes (front and back)?  I had a similar Raleigh before with the original brakes, and it didn't have great stopping power, so I would want to upgrade the brakes.

I think my first step may be to change out the bottom bracket.  I'm sure it's time to replace it and I've never done it before so I would like to give it a try.  I've done a bit of research and it seems this may be an old-style threading system?  Thefore, any tips on how to identify, measure, and replace this part?

Thanks and hope to hear from you soon.
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kflorek

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Reply with quote  #4 
You are being fabulously generous to PennyF@rthing with your time, Tenspeed.

For anybody getting involved in a project like PennyF@rthing there are at least a hundred valuable BikemanforU youtube videos to see and enjoy. Once you understand that: search, click, watch, enjoy. You can get a better idea of what you want to know.

 I can't see fixies for anything myself. But some people want to participate in a trend or fad. If you need to transport yourself and something else from one place to another in a reasonable amount of time, several gears are always an advantage. But if you just want to do stunts exclusively, I don't see why you would need more than one gear. I never do stunts.
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PennyF@rthing

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Reply with quote  #5 
Hello,

I think I just took an accurate measurement with a caliper and the reading is 69 mm, so that would suggest 24 TPI, but it has a cottered crank?

Thanks for the link to Brown's page, I will read that in detail and thanks for the heads up on the videos.  I already watched a few and they're great.

Here's the bike!

6.jpeg 

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soup

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Reply with quote  #6 
PennyF@rthing.

  As Tenspeed intimates do you really want to change this bike, looks fine to me (mind you pics can be deceptive).

   New cabling (always a good idea on an old bike), new bar tape/decals and a damn good clean(and lube)and she'll be right.

I am 5' 4", 52, a tad overweight, diabetic and I live in Scotland so gears are pretty much required for me (I have never even contemplated [except in nightmares] single speed).
 Maybe if you just want to experiment with SS something cheapish(you could forego longevity, but NOT some of the complete tat that E-bay/Amazon/Craigslist has) would do.  If YOU find SS suitable maybe go ahead and convert the one you have to SS.  Ok now you may have two bikes but the ideal number of bikes you want is n+1 where n is the number of bikes you already have.
   You seem to have a realistic expectation of cost of renovation V cost to buy, so I shall merely point out that you will spend a LOT more doing it up compared to its resale value.

On the bottom bracket front I have just changed mine, the one I removed has "written" on it the sizes and thread dimensions so it was a straight(ish) replacement.  Maybe you will find that any bracket you take out will have dimensions stamped/written on it, wouldn't rely on that happening though I tend to find that anything I think "oh that will be..." invariably isn't.
If it is (as it almost certainly will be) a non-casette type BB,  replace the BB with a casette job you will be replacing the chain-ring/cranks anyway.

Edted mainly to correct minor typos.


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Reply with quote  #7 
Additional:-

As Tenspeed says in respect of the bottom bracket(indeed any specialised items) get the right tools (they're plenty availlable). As with all tools do not get the cheapest rather ones commensurate with the expected amount of use.
  Someone who does the job once or twice every few years is going to get a different level than someone (say Bikeman) who uses them everyday.

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Pamela

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PennyF@rthing
...I just want to use this bike as a way to learn more about fixing/tinkering with old bikes....


Hi PennyF@arthing, Very nice looking Raleigh. Cleaning, lubing, installing new rubber, and then riding the bike with it's original set-up will give an idea how the frame handles and how it fits you. This can help avoid investing dough into a frame that isn't fun to ride.

Riding a vintage road bike with it's original set-up also provides a pre-investment opportunity to experience what riding a fixed gear actually feels like: Select one or more of the 10 gears close to the fixie ratio you may be considering and try riding it for a few weeks or however long is necessary to reach a decision. If you haven't tried riding a fixie, this goldilocks method might be useful.

Recognize this bike?



Tenspeed's note about decals and your Raleigh's chrome-tipped forks reminded me of this video below:



All the best for project success!

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PennyF@rthing

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Reply with quote  #9 
Hello everyone,

Thanks for the replies.

In regard to TenSpeed, thanks I think it's a good looking bike too.  The reason the rear brake cable is sagging is because I took off the rear brakes when I was taking off the rack that normally sits over the rear wheel.  So nothing is hooked up to that brake line, so that's why it looks a bit weird.

Soup- I do want to tinker around on this bike for a winter project.  The project is still in the very early planning stages so I'm not 100% set on singlespeed but its just an early idea.  Thanks for the information on the BB, I'll look to see if there's any measurements when I get it out.  I'm having a bit of trouble getting the cotter out of the cranks right now.  In terms of special tools, I'll need a lockring wrench and another specific rectangle-shaped wrench, correct?

Pamela-thanks for the videos and the tip about riding it singlespeed for a bit to see if I like it.
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masterbrown2002

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Reply with quote  #10 
In all honesty since you want to "tinker" to learn about bikes, I would strip it all down give it a good deep clean, re-lubricate and reassemble.  I wouldn't go changing too much unless you really need too.
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Pamela

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Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PennyF@rthing
I'm having a bit of trouble getting the cotter out of the cranks right now.  In terms of special tools...


No special tools needed to get the cotter pin out of a crank arm. You will need lots of persistence and you'll have to beat it up and get it out any way you can. It may seem too tough to get off, but cotter pins are notorious for giving a hard time. Here's BikemanforU's take on it.




Regarding bottom bracket removal, this instructional video's a good place to start




All the best for success!

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PennyF@rthing

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Reply with quote  #12 
Hello,

Soup and TenSpeed- I appreciate the comments/opinions and I see where you guys are coming from. 

Also, that plan for the bike that TenSpeed proposed doesn't sound too bad.  I may end up replacing more parts than you suggest, but we'll see how it goes.

Pamela- the special tools I was talking about were more in reference to the bottom bracket once I get the cranks off.  I've watched a few videos for different styles of BB's and it seems that BikeMan always ends up using 1 or 2 very specific wrenches.  One usually for the lockring and then another for the "ends" (still don't have all the terminology) of the bottom bracket.  I have applied lubricant to the cotter pins and let them sit for a day or two now, so I'll give it another try soon to see if I can force them out.

Thanks again for all the help.
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Pamela

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Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PennyF@rthing
...the special tools I was talking about were more in reference to the bottom bracket once I get the cranks off.  I've watched a few videos for different styles of BB's and it seems that BikeMan always ends up using 1 or 2 very specific wrenches.  One usually for the lockring and then another for the "ends" (still don't have all the terminology) of the bottom bracket...


Hi PennyF@arthing, I believe the specific wrenches you refer to are cone wrenches, as shown in the BikemanforU video posted in this thread titled Bottom Bracket Removal, the HCW series. Good luck with your project, Pamela

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BikemanforU

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Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tenspeed
Good looking bike!  It looks just like the one in the 1974 Raleigh USA catalog:

http://www.bulgier.net/pics/bike/Catalogs/Raleigh74/10GrandPrix.jpg

I would agree that it is a 1974.  Clues to an early 1970s vintage are cottered cranks, center pull brakes, wide flange hubs and front derailleur routing over the shell instead of under. Your bike looks clean and unmolested and even the saddle is correct.  The only thing that jumps out at me as wrong are the brake lines are both too long and the back one should be routed over the bars.  A good bath and some red bar tape and she'd be right!  You sure you want to strip her down?  She's a good looking bike, and a large frame too.  Ah well, your bike, she will make a great single speed.

Oh, 24 TPI...You said it is a Holland made bike, and road bikes seem to be a separate consideration, though Brown did say derailleur bikes.  I think I would go under the assumption that it is standard English 24 TPI and get a 103mm cartridge.  Then, if the cartridge proves too short or the threading wrong I am sure Bikeman would work out a trade in.  Pam could clarify their policy on that.


I had a 24" wheel Raleigh  Record in orange for Christmas 1973 or 1974... This forum is cool just learning how to use it.... VERY COOL.... Be on the lookout we had a troll.... I got him and his IP address if you see any crap on here please let me know ASAP.. Thanks for being a friend and a fan, Bart
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PennyF@rthing

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Reply with quote  #15 
Hello,

I have an update for anyone who is interested.  The bottom bracket is off!  It was a bit tricky because one of the cotter pins did not want to come out and then I had to purchase the appropriate tool (an HCW 11 shown below in one of the photos).  Also, I know I first mentioned I was considering a singlespeed but I've changed my mind and I think I'm going to keep it a 10-speed with some part upgrades.   I know I'm not following a linear restoration path here but the project keeps changing the more research I do. 

So now I'm faced with three options, listed below.

1.) I can get a new bottom bracket and new crankset and put them on.

2.) I can get a new bottom bracket and keep the old crankset.  However, if I do this I will need to find two new cotter pins because one is completely unusable (damaged during the process of getting it out) and the other one could be replaced.

3.) I could re-grease the bottom bracket and put it back in along with the old crankset.  (Same issue as above regarding finding 2 new cotter pins.

In terms of size if I get a new bottom bracket.  The bottom bracket shell is 69 mm and the length of the spindle from end-to-end is 138 mm (this might not be precise because the caliper was too small for this so I had to use a ruler).  Also 16GC was stamped on the spindle.  Any thoughts? 

Here are some pictures.

  13.jpeg   

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PennyF@rthing

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Reply with quote  #16 
I only uploaded one photo in case anyone is wondering where the others are since I said "photos' in the last post.  My bad.
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soup

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Reply with quote  #17 
I would not even consider putting the old BB back (after 40 years it will be pretty much FUBAR). It may have not been used for the last 40 years and still have its factory lube but why chance it?

If making a rehash rather than a 'like for like' restoration go cassette bottom bracket. Measuring the BB 'holder' (technical term there [biggrin]) on the frame should give you one of two numbers either 68 (the 69 you measured is likely to be 68 [only 1mm difference easy to make that sort of 'difference' in mesurement.])  or 73 (2? [confused] )   The spindle length is a bit more problematic, it is pretty much a suck it and see job, maybe  have a rough guesstimate (some would say very rough as you are trying to guess a cartridge spindle length from a cottered system) of the spindle size.  These run from 103 to 127 (in about six steps) so there can be a lot of variation in the lengths.  103 is pretty much for single chain rings whilst 127s are pretty much for triples (this is just a rough guide)  Is there a bike shop near you that would let you try various lengths (they may not normally but may stretch a point if they think you will allways buy from them from now on [another cash cow I mean tinkerer [biggrin]]) ?  Does Bike man have a 'try-no fit-return' policy?

Ah the joys of a rehash.

Again Best of luck.


Thoughts (not reccomendations) :-
Spot the "Likelys" and "mays"

Road bike - Likely to be a double.
Mmm spindles likely to fit - 113, 118
Slightly large may well be able to be used (adjust limit screws ).  Slightly small may be unusable.

118 to start experiment.

Edited for extra thoughts and the bit below.

I have just read Tenspeed's post and I have to say whilst agreeing that chainwheels are pretty indestructible they are not "imortal".  I have just had to change the chainwheels on my hybrid as the chain was slipping (new chain and new freewheel fitted) this 'slipping' was most noticeable on the middle ring so chainwheels can and do wear out just not very quickly. Tooth profile will wear (eventually) so any noticeable amount of shark fining of the chainwheel teeth profile means I would replace.
[image]  Worn teeth on larger ring, more or less OK teeth on smaller ring


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Reply with quote  #18 
Tenspeed:- Why would it be FUBAR?

...Because I am stupid and tried to be quantum, thinking of two things at once.
I managed to think of a cassette BB whilst talking about a cottered crank one.
I wouldn't fancy using a cassette that was forty years old but a cottered crank one once cleaned up is probably usable.

Aside :- How would I go about correctly quoting someone ?
Other forums have edit/delete~post~quote buttons but I cannot see them on this (only edit~delete).

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Reply with quote  #19 
PennyF@rthing this may give you some ideas.




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Reply with quote  #20 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tenspeed
To quote click on the pencil in the upper right side of the post box. [thumb]


Ta, thx. [thumb]

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PennyF@rthing

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Reply with quote  #21 
Hello,

Thanks guys.

The 138 mm spindle does seem a bit long compared to some of the other numbers I've seen.  But I swear that it's about that size (give or take a mm or 2) when it is measured from the tip of one end to the tip of the other end

I found a cool local bike shop and so what I'm going to do is just bring the frame in and see if they can help me size up a new BB and crankset, and I guess some new wheels and chain with a new freewheel/cassette while I'm there.  (Jeez, this hobby just got expensive, but I knew what I was getting into).  Then I'll take the parts home and try to put it all together.  I'll let everyone know what happens once I'm able to do that. 

Any comments on how many gears I should go for?  Tenspeed- you suggested a nine speed cassette, so stick with two rings in the front to make it an 18-speed?
Also, is it more common today to have a cassette on the rear wheel?

Thanks again.  
 
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Reply with quote  #22 
PennyF@rthing
The "size" you are looking for (roughly) is the size between the insides of the cotter holes.
Taking it to the bike shop and letting them worry about the size seems to be the best idea.

As to gears I have sometimes wished for a lower gear and a higher gear but I have never (well very seldom) wished for more gears.
I run a triple at front 28-38-48 and a six speed at the back 12-28 but then I ride a fairly heavy hybrid, a lot of the times I am off-road, and this is Scotland (the area I am in is called the southern uplands) so need the lower gears [1] (28 front onto 28 rear [although seldom used) is good to have for some of the steep climbs around here) (the 48-12 is good for bombing along downhills [I tend to run out of braves at 35mph]).

   Cassettes at the rear (a freehub system rather than a freewheel) seem to be the thing there is a lot more customisation with a cassette and it is much easier to get off. They are a better "engineered" solution as well.  The only drawback that immediately comes to mind is that if the one way mechanism breaks you have to replace the wheel whereas on a freewheel you just have to replace the cogs as they have the one-way mechanism built in.

[1] I am also 52, a tad overweighc, diabetic and only 5'4"


Edited to add brackets in the search for clarity. Should be a coder with the amount and types of brackets I use. [biggrin]

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PennyF@rthing

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Reply with quote  #23 
Hello,

Thanks for the break-down on gearing.

I have some new and mildly frustrating news.  I brought the bike into a cool LBS to get it sized up for a new BB and crankset.  The mechanic did some quick measurements and presented a shiny new crankset and BB (I couldn't wait to get home and put them on).  The BB was a Shimano square taper UN55 68 X 122.5 mm BB.  Just to be sure that it would work he thought it would be a good idea to check the threading to see if it was 24 or 26 TPI.  After awhile, it was determined that it was 26 TPI, which is the uncommon threading, so the BB that he had just pulled out would not fit.  To double-check, he screwed on some 26 TPI cups and they went in just fine, compared to the 24 TPI BB which did not want to thread on.  So one idea he had was to try to find the old style 26 TPI cups with the new style square taper BB.  It seems like this would work because he used the 26 TPI cups to test this idea with the square taper spindle, but it was a part for the shop and it wasn't for sale (dang).  He also pulled out a VO 122 mm threadless BB which I guess doesn't screw on but instead is a pressure fit?  I didn't purchase this though because it was about twice as expensive as the Shimano BB.

Also, another interesting bit of information is that my shell is between 69 and 70 mm, but he assured a 68 mm BB would work.

He was a lot of help but the only thing I left there with was $2 worth of headset bearings.  So alas, no BB and crankset for me yet.

Therefore, any thoughts on the best remedy.  I haven't started looking online for parts yet (the 26 TPI cups with the square taper spindle) but that's my next move.

Thanks
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Reply with quote  #24 
http://sheldonbrown.com/raleigh26.html
(Link to external site I hope Bikeman doesn't get too upset mods can delete if so.)

Maybe should have looked at this first (I think Tenspeed referenced it but it was pretty much ignored from then on).
  SB(all hail) states that old Raleighs tend to use a 26TPI bottom bracket, and that unless you want to go to GREAT expense, rethreading is about all you can do (unless you can find 26TPI cups and suitable square taper spindle) however this will leave the threads not as strong as they were before and few LBSs carry the proper equipment to do it.
   So it looks like new 26TPI cups with suitable spindle (internet?).
  He also talk(s/ed he's dead now) of the shell length being slightly larger (as your mechanic chappy said) than the (now) standard 69  .

Maybe the shell can be refaced?  Maybe the 1~2mm can be "adjusted out"?
^ Spot the guesses never had this "situation" before^

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PennyF@rthing

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Reply with quote  #25 
Yup, I did read that link to Sheldon Brown's page about older Raleigh bikes, but I still wasn't 100% certain it was 26 TPI because I had read some other things that said it may be 24 TPI.  That was one of the reasons I finally thought it was time to just bring it in to a bike shop. 

I looked around for a bit last night for the 26 TPI cups with the square taper spindle but so far no luck.

Speaking of BikeMan, anyone know the best way to get a hold of him?  I tried his mesage box on the website under the "contact us" tab once.  Maybe he has a solution that would fit my bike, plus it would be good to support the website/company since I've been using the forum and watching the videos so much.

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Reply with quote  #26 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tenspeed

or...Just swap the spindle and use the original cups?  Duh!  I think that would work: http://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vintage/384951-retapping-raleigh-26-tpi-bottom-bracket-problems.html


Do you not run into problems with the actual balls there?

Ah, the sainted Sheldon states (on that page linked to earlier) that this is by far the cheapest solution, but as Raleigh has a slightly smaller (diameter) spindle the balls will present a problem, unusual size balls(ooer missus)  have to be used these are NOT normally held by your LBS but you will be able to source them on the 'net.   There is a whole section on that page devoted to ensuring the balls run correctly in the bearing surfaces .

   Raleigh cups have the reputation of being really tough so your old ones should be usable; if they can't be, there should (<famous last words) be lots availlable on the likes of E-bay (maybe even worth getting a whole frame getting the cups out and ditching the rest). 

I can only see one cottered crankset on Amazon, and that is a single at 42 Teeth but you can  get sets of cotter pins there  so maybe a clean up (new balls/new cups [if required]) and refit rather than replace.
(you could get a lathe, learn how to use it and 'turn up' your own replacement spindle. [biggrin]  or have a light engineering firm make the bits for you or... I am getting into pie in the sky territory here.)

Hay, if restoration /renovation was easy everyone would do it!


Edited to add the Amazon search stuff, and the (rather poor attempt at) humour

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Reply with quote  #27 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tenspeed
As long as they are all from the same batch they will run in the race fine. 


True but the Raleigh ones are a different size.  Not just manufacturing tolerance but a different nominal size.

  I (YMMV) don't know enough to think " ah well a ten mill hudgiemchwifer should fit" I tend to stick to instructions, boring but safe.

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Reply with quote  #28 
Yes, one solution (if I can find the part) is to just re-use the 26 TPI cups that came off with the bottom bracket and look for a more modern square taper spindle.  I've been looking on Amazon and Ebay and calling local bike shops to see if they have it.  The other solution I see is to just go for the VO threadless BB.  But I'm not on a time limit here so I'll just look around a bit longer and see if I can find a square taper spindle that would fit.  If I don't find it, or if it proves too difficult to pursue, well a threadless BB it is.  No big deal. 
I did hear about Phil Wood and they are a little pricey.  However, it looks like they provide great products for this niche market.
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Reply with quote  #29 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PennyF@rthing
...He was a lot of help but the only thing I left there with was $2 worth of headset bearings. So alas, no BB and crankset for me yet...Thanks


A double crankset for a road bike typically specifies a 122mm spindle when the BBT shell is 68mm.
Sealed cartridge square-taper 68mm BBT with 122mm spindle will work on this bike.
SunLite and Origin8 square taper BBTs are pretty much universally compatible, which is why we use them in the shop.

http://www.bikemanforu.com/expanded-catalog/bottom-brackets/cartridge-bottom-brackets/square-taper/



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Reply with quote  #30 
Any good PF?
http://www.amazon.com/Sunlite-Bottom-Bracket-Thrdls-Repair/dp/B001642Z48/ref=pd_sim_sbs_sg_6?ie=UTF8&refRID=1CHD94P4E6N2K39BQN91

Mmm that's for a 68 shell yours is a bit bigger:scraping paint , "facer"?. Or will it just be a case of you torque it till it fits (70 rather than 68, 2mm of 'not on far enough' shouldn't matter)?

OK it's Amazon and NOT your LBS but "needs must..."
..and it's for stripped threads, will it work if the threads are there but of the wrong size?  < mechanic needed [1]

[1] Asked the son (he is a time served mechanic) , he said, only half-listening, "I know nothing about bikes"



(Link wasn't to Wallmart ten hours ago was Amazon, no idea what is going on.)
(Now it's Amazon again.) [confused]


Edited to correct minor typos and add son bit.  Then again to post about the link confusion.

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Reply with quote  #31 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tenspeed
Hello, Pam.  His problem is he has a Raleigh threaded 26TPI bottom bracket. Does Bikeman have an easy solution for this, besides the threadless BBs?


Hi Tenspeed, This juicy question requires a sip ' courage. BikemanforU will be discussing easy solutions today at 5:15pm eastern for LIVE Tech Happy Hour. Please join us. PennyF@arthing's project will be on the docket again this Saturday during the our YouTube Bike Shop LIVE Show on the BikemanforU Channel, so please tune in.  This week's Dec. 5 show starts as usual at 10am eastern. He made the preview vid below for you guys.



In the meantime, a few options:

Muscle a 24 tpi BBT into the shell - Damage risk? Can it be undone? What even makes this a consideration? BikemanforU will be covering this in the LIVE sessions.

SunLite's threadless repair BBT - probably minimal risk of damage to the shell because the part sandwiches itself inside, which means the install could be undone if desired. Here's the 122.5 spindle length unit we suggest.

Clean, re-pack and re-install the original parts with new cotter pins.

Bottom line - What do you want to do? Intent and the passion for bikes that we share underwrite each solution and that's what makes this a great topic of conversation. Restore, preserve, rehab, upgrade, how much damage do you want to risk, time frame, budget, what's available - all these and more factors go into choices made and the direction the project will ultimately take.

Tenspeed and Soup, many thanks for all the knowledge,experience and expertise that you guys are sharing. You're the best! This Raleigh BBT article by the late, great Sheldon Brown may have been shared. Worth sharing again. Sheldon's one of my heros and chief resources - besides BMFU.

Here's a look at BikemanforU's take on the threadless repair BBT


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Reply with quote  #32 
Hello everyone,

Big thanks again to TenSpeed and Soup for all the suggestions and comments.  And thanks Pamela for the comments and the link to the Sunlite threadless BB.  And of course thanks to BikeMan for the live show preview video, and the rest of the videos.  I've watched all the videos on this forum chain, but as soon as I get some time I'll watch the full 2 hours of the live show from this Saturday (Dec. 6th).

So I feel a little guilty saying this now, after all the help that you guys have given me with the videos and everything, but I got a bit impatient and went to the local bike shop and picked up the VO threadless BB with a new crank on Friday.  Pamela- I must have just missed your post from that day (12/5) because I was checking the site during the day while I was at work.  Then I just got around to checking the forum today and I'm catching up on everything that has happened. 

Anyways, it looks like the VO BB should work.  However, this project is far from over so there will plenty of opportunity to support the BikeMan coming up in the near future.

Once again, thanks to everybody who is helping me along with this project.  The BB can sure be a beast, but I think I have a handle on it now. 
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Reply with quote  #33 
Hi PennyF@arthing - Would love to see more pix of how your project's progressing! In the meantime, the 'Cotter Pin Special' on the LIVE stream show starts here at 23:16 or feast on the whole enchilada known as Bike Shop - BikemanforU LIVE Show S2E22 below


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Reply with quote  #34 
Hello everyone,

Sorry I dropped off the radar.  I was out of the city all last week and I got in late last night.  I'll post some photos soon (sometime in the next few days).  Thanks for inquiring!
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Reply with quote  #35 
Hi,and welcome back, PennyF@rthing perhaps you should get in touch with Froymot as he is performing a restoration and wants to know if a threadless BB will fit over the wrong sized threads (rather than damaged threads).  I was going to say PM him but maybe it will be better if posted in the forum for all to see, then everyone will have the information of one way to deal with a (now non-standard) 26TPI shell.

Edited to correct spelling mistake.

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Reply with quote  #36 
Well I just put the BB and the new crankset on so I could take a photo, but the BB adventure is not over just yet.  I put everything together and noticed that the crankset wobbled when I gave it a good spin.  So I took it apart, tightened up the BB a little bit more but it still had a wobble.  So I took both the cranks off and changed the position that they attach to the BB spindle (it's a square taper spindle so there's four options to attach the cranks onto the spindle, so I tried each of the four options).  Some positions were better than others but there's still a wobble.  So I emailed the manufacturer and they are very kindly going to send me a new BB.  Once I get it, I'll put it on and I'll let everyone know.

Soup-I'll check out Froymots post shortly.  Thanks for the heads up.
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Reply with quote  #37 
So I hope this triggers a reply. I've started a rehab of a 70's vintage Raleigh Grand Prix. Aside from the cabling and tires/tubes/cleaning/derailleur eval, I'm looking ito how to attack the BB issue. The last post left me hanging....did the threadless BB work? What dimensions did you buy? What crankset did you fit to the new BB?

I've unearthed a treasure trove of Raleigh parts for components like brakes, brake levers, shift levers, etc, BUT very little in the way of parts for BB and headset.

This is my "B" project. I am also rebuilding a 1989 Specialized Allez (my old backup bike to the Allez Epic I used to race very badly)

Cheers all

Raleigh_1.jpg  Raleigh_2.jpg  Raleigh_3.jpg  Raleigh_4.jpg  Raleigh_5.jpg 




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